SoftBank Seen Leaving Boards Of India’s Paytm, Policybazaar

The move is part of SoftBank‘s strategy to exit from the boards of most of listed portfolio companies, as it expects it will have fewer regulatory issues to deal with

 

Representatives of SoftBank Group Corp will step down from the boards of Indian digital payments firm Paytm and the parent of online insurance aggregator Policybazaar, a person with direct knowledge of the matter said.

The decision is part of SoftBank‘s global strategy to exit from the boards of most of its listed portfolio companies, said the source, adding that the Japanese tech conglomerate expected it would leave fewer regulatory issues to tackle.

SoftBank will, however, retain its shareholding in the two Indian companies, added the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity as the matter has not yet been made public.

SoftBank, Paytm and Policybazaar did not immediately respond to Reuters request for comment.

The news came on the same day shares in Paytm tumbled more than 12%, after the central bank barred the company’s payments bank from taking on new customers and ordered an audit of its IT systems.

The Reserve Bank of India said on Friday it would allow Paytm Payments Bank to take on new customers subject to specific permission after reviewing the IT auditor’s report.

Both Paytm, formally known as One97 Communications, and PB Fintech Ltd, the parent of Policybazaar, went public last year. Business news website Moneycontrol first reported the development.

 

• Reuters with additional editing by Jim Pollard

 

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Jim Pollard

Jim Pollard is an Australian journalist based in Thailand since 1999. He worked for News Ltd papers in Sydney, Perth, London and Melbourne before travelling through SE Asia in the late 90s. He was a senior editor at The Nation for 17+ years and has a family in Bangkok.